AVMED - Do you have a problem with an assessment?

Discuss and/or express your disgust about anything Aviation Medical
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up-into-the-air
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AVMED - Do you have a problem with an assessment?

Postby up-into-the-air » Thu Jan 22, 2015 9:00 pm

Hi,

Quite a few people have been complaining in a number of forums that they have had serious problems with casa AVMED assesments.

These problems include failure to answer letters, e-mails, phone calls or FAXES.

There have been numerous long delays for completed DAME medicals and we are looking to find out what the range of problems really is and how they can [if not already rectified], be rectified.

I am a private pilot who has been through the mill as well, due to a mistake by a DAME, which resulted in my Class 1 being suspended. I was horrified when this occurred and would not wish the same treatment for anyone else.

If you fall into this group, please click through to this page and assist us in compiling a proper list and range of issues faced.

We all have heard of the CVD problems and the current case before the AAT, which is attempting to overturn a long determined principle [with no accidents in Australia (or world-wide) of CVD related accidents. casa say that the US accident had CVD symptoms, but the real cause was on-ground interference with the PAPI visual indications due to the local terrain.

Please assist us as this will form part of a private review of AVMED and it's impact on aviation jobs in Australia.

UITA

Contact via:


http://vocasupport.com/avmed/
TimothyOa
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Re: AVMED - Do you have a problem with an assessment?

Postby TimothyOa » Mon Jan 26, 2015 1:49 pm

Quoting up-into-the-air:
I am a private pilot who has been through the mill as well, due to a mistake by a DAME, which resulted in my Class 1 being suspended.

Private Pilot with a Class 1 Aviation Medical?

Why do you need to have a Class 1 Aviation Medical?

Why put yourself through that?

Types of Medical Certificate and uses
Classes of Medical Certificates
CASA issues Class 1, 2 and 3 Medical Certificates to persons who seek them. Certain holders of civil aviation authorisations are required to hold a medical certificate when exercising the privileges of the authorisation. Each class of medical certificate also has a medical standard set out in tables in Part 67 of the CASR. A summary of the above follows:

Class 1
This medical standard applies to holders of an Air Transport Pilot Licence, Commercial Pilot Licence (other than balloons), Multi-crew Pilot (aeroplane) Licence, Flight Engineer Licence or Student Flight Engineer Licence.

Class 2
This medical applies to holders of a Student Pilot Licence, Private Pilot Licence, Commercial Pilot (Balloon) Licence and Flight Radio Operator Licence.

Class 3
This medical standard applies to holders of an Air Traffic Control Licence or and Flight Service Officers.

Recreational Aviation Medical Practitioner's Certificate (RAMPC)
CASR Part 61 provides for an additional medical standard called the Recreational Aviation Medical Practitioner’s Certificate that allows appropriately licenced pilots to exercise the privileges of the recreational pilot licence without the requirement to hold a CASA Class 2 medical. The Recreational Aviation Medical Practitioner’s Certificate is based on a modified unconditional driver’s licence medical certificate for a private motor vehicle.

This type of medical examination can be undertaken by any general practitioner and is similar in form to the Austroads Inc. Drivers Licence Medical examination.
Find out if the Recreational Aviation Medical Practitioner’s Certificate is suitable for you.

Duration of Validity of Medical Certificates
Unless otherwise advised by the Aviation Medicine Section, a:

Class 1 Medical Certificate is valid for one year.
Class 2 Medical Certificate is valid for four years, for applicants less than 40 years of age on the day of issue, and in all other cases for two years.
Class 3 Medical Certificate is valid for two years.
Note: Where an applicant's medical condition is under review, the duration of a Medical Certificate may be varied at the discretion of the Principal Medical Officer.
Refer to:
http://www.casa.gov.au/scripts/nc.dll?WCMS:STANDARD::pc=PC_91594

I have had quite the opposite experience, actually. When I have gone for my Class 1 Aviation Medicals, in the past, I have asked for extra checks to be done, for example blood work, PAS Test, Bowl Cancer Screen, et al.

Only once, there was some minor clerical error with my Application regarding vision, which CASA flagged, but my AME owned it, invited me back in, without charge, and satisfied, he took care of everything through CASA AVMED department. No harm. No foul. I continued flying.

My AME is completely professional and I respect him as a person and as a Medical Doctor.

My AME's advice or caution was, "You know that if anything comes back adverse I am obligated to report to CASA."

My reply to my AME was, "I know. If there is anything wrong with my health that would prevent me from providing the uttermost level of safety to my passengers and crew, that I should not hold a Medical and should be grounded."

That IS the way I see it.

IF you have anything wrong with your health, then you should not be flying.

I knew a fellow Captain, when flying overseas, who developed Kidney Stones. He was medically grounded. He went to have treatment, locally and overseas. He still could not obtain medical clearance. So, he was forced to resign from the contract.

He went to work as a Captain, in another overseas location, where they were none the wiser about his "pre-existing" medical condition. How wrong is that? Kidney Stones could cause immediate incapacitation.

In another overseas location, during a mass-Medical, I witnessed a Boeing 747-400 Captain faking his ability to support his weight on his good leg, raise himself onto his toes of his good leg and lower himself on his good leg, stating that is as much motion as he had, when the Doctors were assessing the outcome of surgery and rehabilitation to an Achilles Tendon caused by an off-duty sports injury. In my judgment, with that little mobility or range of motion of either his good leg or the one repaired and rehabilitated one, he could not actuate the rudder pedals or toe brakes. But, he managed to bullsh!t the foreign doctors. How wrong is that?

IF you are not 100% fit to fly and do not meet the conditions for holding a Class of Medical for the Pilot Licence you hold, then don't!

That simple.

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